The International Association for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures is an association of various national committees with the shared goal of "The reunification of all the surviving Parthenon Sculptures in the New Acropolis Museum in Athens"
slideshow 1 slideshow 2 slideshow 3 slideshow 4

Greece announces new committee to advise on Parthenon Marbles issue

The Greek government has anounced the formation of a new committee within Greece to advise on the issue of the return of the Parthenon Marbles

 

Last Updated Thursday, 20 September 2012
New committee established to press for return of Parthenon Marbles

The culture ministry on Wednesday announced that it will re-establish a special advisory committee to coordinate actions aimed at securing the repatriation of the Parthenon Marbles.

The president of the Melina Mercouri Foundation, Christoforos Argyropoulos, archaeologist Eleni Korka, attorney Irini Stamatoudi, who heads the Intellectual Property Organisation, and foreign ministry representative Panos Kalogeropoulos were listed as members of the committee, announced by Alternate Culture Minister Costas Tzavaras.

"Greece's moral right is above every objection that is based on arguments aired as mere delay tactics, and aiming to brush aside the basic principle that is universally applied, namely, the necessity of cultural monuments to be repatriated, meaning a return to the place of their origin," Tzavaras said.

SOURCE: ATHENS NEWS AGENCY

Read the original article here.

Greek deputy culture minister meets Finnish Committee

The deputy culture minister from Greece, Petros Alivizatos, has met with the Finnish Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles.

Greek Deputy Minister of Culture Meets With Finnish Committee for Restitution of Parthenon Marbles
By Stella Tsolakidou on January 25, 2012 in news

During his formal visit to Finland, the Greek Deputy Minister of Culture and Tourism, Petros Alivizatos, has met with the Finnish Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles.

The meeting was attended by the Vice President of the Committee and Professor of the Modern Greek language at the University of Helsinki, Mrs. Mika Kajava, the Treasurer of the Committee, Mrs. Teodora Oker-Blom, the Secretary of the Committee and lawyer, Mr. Eero Heimolinna, and the YLE journalist Jari Niemelä.

During the meeting, the members of the Committee repeated their intention to support the efforts to return the Parthenon marbles back to Greece, and promised to enhance the dynamics of the appeal by introducing initiatives both inside and outside Finland and by directly submitting intervention appeals to the British authorities.

Mr. Alivizatos pointed out that the Greek Ministry of Culture, Auto Insurance and Tourism will proceed with intensifying the efforts of the Greek government to get back the marbles of Parthenon by closely cooperating with the respective International Committees.

Moreover, the Greek Deputy Minister highlighted that it is high time the issue drew international attention again, due to the coming Olympic Games of London in 2012.

Read the original article here.

Latest newsletter from Marbles Reunited Campaign

The latest newsletter from the Marbles Reunited campaign in the UK is now available to download.

You can download is from their website here. There is also an archive of previous newsletters here.

Pavlos Geroulanos meets with the BCRPM

Pavlos Geroulanos, Greece's Culture Minister, has met with the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles in London.

Greek Culture Minister Meets with British Committee for Restitution of Parthenon Marbles
Posted on 08 November 2011

A meeting was held among representatives of the British Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles and the Greek Minister of Culture and Tourism Pavlos Geroulanos, who travelled to the United Kingdom in order to attend the London Tourism Exhibition.

The meeting’s attendees included the British Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament, Andrew George, who promotes the restitution of the Parthenon Marbles to Greece.

Moreover, the British Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles believes that Joanna Lumley would be a great supporter of the restitution of the Parthenon Marbles, since in her recent documentary named “Greek Odyssey” she was promoting Greek culture and tourism.

According to sources, Joanna Lumley had a meeting with the director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor during which she said that she thinks that the Parthenon Marbles should be returned to their proper place in Greece.

Finally, the British Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles has made known to British People that the London 2012 Olympic Games could probably be the right time for Britain to do something for the better, by returning the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful place in Greece.

Read the original article here.

Marbles Reunited chair writes about reasons why the Parthenon Marbles should go back to Greece

Andrew George MP, Chair of Marbles Reunited, writes for Politics.com about why now is the right time to return the sculptures.

Comment: No bailout, but will the Elgin marbles do?
Tuesday, 28 June 2011 10:35 AM
We might not want to be involved in the bail out, but returning the Elgin Marbles would show we are Greece’s friend.
By Andrew George MP

Whilst the current financial crisis dominates all current press coverage relating to Greece, there is no reason why we should use this as an excuse to ignore other key Anglo-Hellenic issues.

At present, news coming from Greece is predominantly negative – returning the Parthenon Sculptures (popularly known as the Elgin Marbles) would give people there something positive – a reason to celebrate and something that would increase the tourist draw to the country, helping to revive their economy.

Co-incidentally, June 20th 2011 marked the second anniversary of the opening of the new Acropolis Museum in Athens – an event that raised the issue of the return of the Parthenon Marbles to a level of global interest. Britain however continues to act as though nothing has changed.

Although the Parthenon Sculptures existed in Greece for over 2000 years, the British Museum has had them for less than 200 years, yet seems to feel that they are now as much a part of the museum as they are a part of Greece’s history.

[...]

Read the rest of the article here.