The International Association for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures is an association of various national committees with the shared goal of "The reunification of all the surviving Parthenon Sculptures in the New Acropolis Museum in Athens"
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BCRPM announces new chairman

After running the BCRPM's campaign for a number of years, Anthony Snodgrass has stepped down as Chair to be replaced by Eddie O'Hara, a former MP who stood down at the last election.

New Chairman for the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles
Friday, 03 December 2010
03 December 2010

PROFESSOR Anthony Snodgrass retired from his position as the chairman of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles (www.parthenonuk.com and twitter BCRPM) and it was announced former MP Eddie O’Hara would take over the position.

Eddie O’Hara recently retired after 20 years as MP for Knowsley South and describes himself as “an unreconstituted classicist and lifelong supporter of the campaign for the reunification of the Parthenon Marbles”.

Throughout his parliamentary career he tirelessly promoted the case for the Marbles to be returned to Athens, using various means including Early Day Motions, parliamentary questions, debates, meetings with ministers and the presentation of a Museums Bill, whose purpose was to remove any question as to whether museum trustees could divest themselves of objects in their collections.

Eddie O’Hara commented: “Professor Snodgrass has earned universal respect for the dignity and scholarship with which he graced the campaign and I am very much looking forward to carrying on his great work and continuing to campaign for the Parthenon Marbles to be returned to Athens.”

The British Museum has deployed a seductive new argument against their return. They have argued that the British Museum is one of a small number of ‘encyclopaedic’ museums, such as the Louvre and the New York Metropolitan Museum, and that the Parthenon Sculptures in the British Museum form part of a wider narrative of the development of western art together with outside influences upon it. They believe to return them would damage the integrity of this narrative.

Eddie O’Hara disagrees with these arguments and believes there are many other exemplars that the Greek Government could make available to replace the Marbles that wouldn’t damage the integrity of their narrative.

Eddie O’Hara also believes the British Museum overstates its case when it says that after two centuries in its collection the Marbles no longer play a part in any Greek narrative.

He comments: “They should not put narratives in competition with each other but if they do surely the most important story to be told by and on behalf of the Marbles is that they form an integral unity with those in Athens, and together they form an integral unity with one of the most important historical monuments in the world.”

Eddie O’Hara concurs with Eleni Cubitt, Hon Secretary of the Committee as he would welcome a credible response to the argument for the return of the Marbles on the grounds of human rights. The Faro Convention proposes that for a cultural community to be deprived of enjoyment of its cultural heritage is a violation of its human rights.

“The Greeks are a cultural community as defined by the convention and the Marbles are part of the cultural heritage with which they identify. Where there is a dispute good practice as defined by the convention includes measures to look at cooperation and reconciliation of these differences” concludes Eddie O’Hara.

Eddie O’Hara studied Literae Humaniores at Magdalen College, Oxford and has been General Rapporteur for the Cultural Heritage and Museums Rapporteur for the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe.

Read the original article here.

Latest newsletter from Marbles Reunited Campaign

The latest newsletter from the Marbles Reunited campaign in the UK is now available to download.

You can download is from therir website here. There is also an archive of previous newsletters here.

Dimitrios Pantermalis, the director of the New Acropolis Museum talks about the building

Dimitrios Pantermalis gave a talk at the National Gallery of Art in Washington on the New Acropolis Museum.

The New Acropolis Museum: A Conversation with Dimitrios Pandermalis

Dimitrios Pandermalis, president of the board of directors, Acropolis Museum, and professor of archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in conversation with Selma Holo, professor of art history, director of the International Museum Institute, and director of the Fisher Museum of Art, University of Southern California, and Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art.

Professor Dimitrios Pandermalis provides an overview of the construction of the new Acropolis Museum in this podcast recorded on October 17, 2010. Designed by Bernard Tschumi and completed in 2009, the 262,000-square-foot museum rises at the foot of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. This lecture reveals the challenges and responsibilities of creating a modern building atop sensitive archaeological excavations, within the Athens city grid, facing the Parthenon—one of the most influential buildings in Western civilization—and housing ancient sculptures and decorative arts excavated from the Acropolis. This lecture was coordinated with and supported by the American Friends of the Acropolis Museum and the Embassy of Greece in Washington, DC.

Read the original article here or download a podcast of the whole lecture here.

New video about the Parthenon Marbles from the American Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures

The American Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures have created a video about their campaign for the return of the Parthenon Sculptures called All sides of the Parthenon.

You can view the video online here.

Award for best worldwide tourism project in 2010 goes to the New Acropolis Museum

The New Acropolis Museum has been awarded Best Worldwide Tourism project for 2010 by the British Guild of Travel Writers.

New Acropolis Museum wins prestigious award

8 Nov 2010

The New Acropolis Museum in Athens has won the     ‘ (BGTW) prestigious global award for the Best Worldwide Tourism Project for 2010.

The prize was presented to deputy culture and tourism minister Yiorgos Nikitiadis, representing the Greek government, during a ceremony on Sunday night in London.

Nikitiadis thanked the organisers and the voting travel writers, noting that this distinction has opened the door for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to their homeland. (ANA)

Read the original article here.