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Latest newsletter from Marbles Reunited Campaign

The latest newsletter from the Marbles Reunited campaign in the UK is now available to download.

You can download is from therir website here. There is also an archive of previous newsletters here.

Dimitrios Pantermalis, the director of the New Acropolis Museum talks about the building

Dimitrios Pantermalis gave a talk at the National Gallery of Art in Washington on the New Acropolis Museum.

The New Acropolis Museum: A Conversation with Dimitrios Pandermalis

Dimitrios Pandermalis, president of the board of directors, Acropolis Museum, and professor of archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in conversation with Selma Holo, professor of art history, director of the International Museum Institute, and director of the Fisher Museum of Art, University of Southern California, and Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art.

Professor Dimitrios Pandermalis provides an overview of the construction of the new Acropolis Museum in this podcast recorded on October 17, 2010. Designed by Bernard Tschumi and completed in 2009, the 262,000-square-foot museum rises at the foot of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. This lecture reveals the challenges and responsibilities of creating a modern building atop sensitive archaeological excavations, within the Athens city grid, facing the Parthenon—one of the most influential buildings in Western civilization—and housing ancient sculptures and decorative arts excavated from the Acropolis. This lecture was coordinated with and supported by the American Friends of the Acropolis Museum and the Embassy of Greece in Washington, DC.

Read the original article here or download a podcast of the whole lecture here.

New video about the Parthenon Marbles from the American Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures

The American Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Sculptures have created a video about their campaign for the return of the Parthenon Sculptures called All sides of the Parthenon.

You can view the video online here.

Award for best worldwide tourism project in 2010 goes to the New Acropolis Museum

The New Acropolis Museum has been awarded Best Worldwide Tourism project for 2010 by the British Guild of Travel Writers.

New Acropolis Museum wins prestigious award

8 Nov 2010

The New Acropolis Museum in Athens has won the     ‘ (BGTW) prestigious global award for the Best Worldwide Tourism Project for 2010.

The prize was presented to deputy culture and tourism minister Yiorgos Nikitiadis, representing the Greek government, during a ceremony on Sunday night in London.

Nikitiadis thanked the organisers and the voting travel writers, noting that this distinction has opened the door for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to their homeland. (ANA)

Read the original article here.

Callimachus victory Monument goes on display in New Acropolis Museum

After a lengthy reconstruction process, a newly restored monument to the victory of Callimachus has gone on display in the New Acropolis Museum.

Nike Monument unveiled at new Acropolis Museum

10/27/2010

ΑΝΑ-ΜPΑ/The Nike Monument erected in honour of the ancient military commander Callimachus after the Battle of Marathon, its various surviving shards reassembled for the first time to resemble the form they would have had in antiquity, was unveiled in the new Acropolis Museum on Tuesday by Culture and Tourism Minister Pavlos Geroulanos.

In statements at the unveiling, Geroulanos emphasised the importance of the monument 2,500 years after the historic battle, an event broadly regarded as a pivotal moment in the history of European culture.

In 490 B.C. when the Battle of Marathon took place Callimachus was then a ‘polemarch’ or supreme military commander of Athens. With the 10 Athenian generals evenly divided over whether to do battle or surrender to the Persian invasion force, it was he that cast the deciding vote that sent the Athenians into battle and on to their final victory over the Persian Empire.

“Everything now rests of you,” Geroulanos said, quoting directly from the description given by the ancient historian Herodotus of a hypothetical conversation between Callimachus and Miltiades – the general that led the battle and earned Greeks their victory – just before the polemarch cast his vote.

“Today we are not unveiling the monument of just another general but a monument to a democratic process that changed the course of history,” the minister stressed.

Callimachus took part in the battle himself, leading the right wing of the Greek army, but was killed during the fighting. His statue was erected atop of the Athens Acropolis.

According to Prof. Dimitris Pantermalis, the curator of the new Acropolis Museum, the monument has been reconstructed in a modern fashion, using only the original shards in their correct positions, so that a visitor might be able to see the authentic version.

The remnants of the 4.68-metre monument have been affixed to a metal column that holds the various parts in place and is built so that additional fragments might be attached if they are found. It is on display in the museum’s Archaic Monuments’ section.

A short distance from the original there also stands a copy showing archaeologists’ best estimate of what the monument might have looked like when it was whole.

The unveiling of the Nike monument was among a series of events scheduled by the culture and tourism ministry to celebrate the 2,500th anniversary since the Battle of Marathon, which will culminate in the holding of the 28th Classic Athens Marathon on Sunday, in which more than 20,000 athletes from all over the world will take part.

Read the original article here.

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